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Restrictive Lung Disease

Restrictive lung disease refers to a group of thoracic deformities that result in inefficient coupling between the respiratory muscles and the thoracic cage.

Restrictive lung diseases, on the other hand, mean the lungs are unable to fully expand, so they limit the amount of oxygen taken in during inhalation. This limitation also restricts what can be exhaled when compared to an average person.

Restrictive lung diseases cause a decreased lung capacity or volume, so a person’s breathing rate often increases to meet their oxygen demands.

Most restrictive lung diseases are progressive, meaning they worsen over time.

 

Chest Wall Plural Disease

Chest wall disorders are a group of thoracic deformities that result in inefficient coupling between the respiratory muscles and the thoracic cage. The disorders are usually characterised by a restrictive defect and share the potential of long term hypercapnic respiratory failure.

Neuromuscular Disease

Neuromuscular disorders affect the nerves that control voluntary muscles and the nerves that communicate sensory information back to the brain. Nerve cells (neurons) send and receive electrical messages to and from the body to help control voluntary muscles. When the neurons become unhealthy or die, communication between the nervous system and muscles breaks down. As a result, muscles weaken and waste away (atrophy).

Fibrotic Lung Disease

The word “pulmonary” means lung and the word “fibrosis” means scar tissue— similar to scars that you may have on your skin from an old injury or surgery. So, in its simplest sense, pulmonary fibrosis (PF) means scarring in the lungs. Over time, the scar tissue can destroy the normal lung and make it hard for oxygen to get into your blood. Low oxygen levels (and the stiff scar tissue itself) can cause you to feel short of breath, particularly when walking and exercising. Pulmonary fibrosis isn’t just one disease. It is a family of more than 200 different lung diseases that all look very much alike. The PF family of lung diseases falls into an even larger group of diseases called the interstitial lung diseases (also known as ILD), which includes all of the diseases that have inflammation and/or scarring in the lung. Some interstitial lung diseases don’t include scar tissue. When an interstitial lung disease does include scar tissue in the lung, we call it pulmonary fibrosis.